Apple Tree Wassailing Chants and Rhymes
Compiled in The Stations of the Sun by Ronald Hutton


From the South Hams of Devon, recorded 1871

Here's to thee, old apple tree,
Whence thou mayst bud
And whence thou mayst blow!
And whence thou mayst bear apples enow!
Hats full! Caps full!
Bushel--bushel--sacks full,
And my pockets full too! Huzza!


From Cornworthy, Devon, recorded 1805

Huzza, Huzza, in our good town
The bread shall be white, and the liquor be brown
So here my old fellow I drink to thee
And the very health of each other tree.
Well may ye blow, well may ye bear
Blossom and fruit both apple and pear.
So that every bough and every twig
May bend with a burden both fair and big
May ye bear us and yield us fruit such a stors
That the bags and chambers and house run o'er.


From 19th century Sussex and Surrey

Stand fast root, bear well top
Pray the God send us a howling good crop.
Every twig, apples big.
Every bough, apples now.


From 19th century South Hams

Apple-tree, apple-tree,
Bear good fruit,
Or down with your top
And up with your root.


From 19th century Worcestershire

Bud well, bear well
God send you fare well;
Every sprig and every spray
A bushel of apples next New Year Day.


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